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Justice Says Waitlist Must Be Addressed in WV Budget

March 1st, 2020 by WCBC Radio

Governor Jim Justice will refuse to support a budget passed by the West Virginia Legislature that does not include a full elimination of the waitlist for the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Waiver (IDDW) program.
 
Elimination of the waitlist will allow 1,060 additional West Virginians, including more than 600 children, to receive critical services through this waiver program.
 
“I will not support a budget that does not include a full elimination of the IDD Waiver waitlist,” Gov. Justice said. “When it comes to the health and well-being of some of our most vulnerable men, women, and children in West Virginia, I’m not interested in taking half-measures.
 
“Many of these people have been waiting for more than four years now, which is far too long. My proposed budget includes the funding to accomplish this goal.”
 
Gov. Justice announced during his 2020 State of the State address​ that DHHR Cabinet Secretary Bill Crouch and Revenue Secretary Dave Hardy had found a solution to fund the elimination of the waitlist. 
 
The IDDW program gives individuals the choice of receiving support and services in their home and community instead of in an institutional setting. The cost of services provided by the IDDW is 46 percent lower than the cost of services provided by an intermediate care facility for individuals with developmental disabilities. 
 

One Response to “Justice Says Waitlist Must Be Addressed in WV Budget”

  1. March 01, 2020 at 8:57 am, Patrick said:

    There is an unwritten rule, that is also coming to play on the national level. For too many government employees (and legislators at all levels), as long as there is a problem, in this case a wait list, there is a job.

    Get poor people jobs, then welfare workers are not needed.

    Lower African-American unemployment, tougher to play the race card in elections.

    Unsolved problems = jobs for bureaucrats (I was one for 12 years) and elections to “solve” those problems.

    I’ve watched so many of those “problems” go unresolved for over 50 years. You never resolve many issues 100%, but in private industry, the performance of the past 50 years would warrant a grade of “F” and a bunch of firings.

    Reply

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